The .NET Foundation was founded in 2014 to foster .NET open source development and collaboration. We're thrilled to have been a part of some amazing growth and momentum since then! On the platform projects alone, 87% of the people who contribute to the .NET platform don’t work at Microsoft and have made over 61,000 code contributions. With this incredible growth, it’s time to take the .NET Foundation to the next level.

I’m incredibly excited to announce that we are making some big changes to expand the .NET Foundation. As part of our ongoing commitment to open source, we're expanding the .NET Foundation by inviting the entire open source community to take a more active role, to directly guide foundation operations and build the ecosystem.

We're expanding the board from three to seven members, with one single seat appointed by Microsoft and the remaining six elected by the community. Board elections will begin in January 2019, and any person who has contributed to a.NET Foundation open source project is eligible to run for the board and to vote. This new structure will help the .NET Foundation scale with the growing .NET open source ecosystem and allows our entire community to get a lot more involved.

We are also expanding our current technical steering group to a Corporate Sponsor program. In addition to our current sponsors – Red Hat, JetBrains, Google, Unity, Microsoft and Samsung, we are also welcoming Pivotal, Progress Telerik and Insight who are joining today. Welcome!

These changes enable the .NET Foundation to be much more involved across a variety of activities like event sponsorships and speaker grants, outreach and evangelism, providing more technical support services, and expanding project onboarding and mentoring. There is tremendous open source potential in the huge, worldwide .NET developer base and we want to empower and activate it!

Open Membership and Elections

We spent a lot of time looking at open source software foundation models, and deciding what best fit into the .NET ecosystem. We settled on a structure that’s inspired by the GNOME foundation - for more insight and background, see Miguel de Icaza's post. Here are the high level details:

  • Any individual contributor to a .NET Foundation project can apply to become a member. Contributions may include code contributions, documentation, or other significant project contribution.
  • Upon approval, members will be notified with information on completing their membership. We’re requesting $100 annual dues, with liberal waivers for students or financial hardship.
  • Each year, we’ll host an election for the board of directors. Any active member can campaign for a one year term, based on their community standing, plans to advance the .NET open source ecosystem, and past performance in case they are seeking reelection.
  • Each .NET Foundation member can vote in the election. We plan to use ranked choice voting (specifically, single transferable vote), using OpaVote.
  • We'll be running our first annual community elections starting in January 2019. Watch our blog and @dotnetfdn on Twitter for announcements on election dates.

If you've contributed to a .NET Foundation project, I invite you to apply for membership today!

Corporate Sponsorship Program

We're expanding our current Technical Steering Group to a Corporate Sponsor Program, and announcing three new sponsors at launch: Pivotal, Progress Telerik, and Insight.

Why change the TSG to a Corporate Sponsor Program? We recognize that many companies have significant business interests in the future growth and health of the .NET ecosystem, across a variety of business models - platforms, developer tools vendors, consultancies, as well as businesses in other verticals that depend on .NET to run their websites, line-of-business applications, infrastructure, etc. We've had repeated requests from businesses that don't directly fit into the TSG model to join the foundation and get involved. Creating a Corporate Sponsor Program with annual dues will allow the .NET Foundation to have much greater impact and make long-term investments in the .NET community.

Read more about why Pivotal joined the .NET Foundation as a corporate sponsor here.

I’m really happy that our launch partners represent different verticals and business models. .NET Foundation corporate sponsorship is for any company that sees business value in promoting the growth of a healthy .NET open source ecosystem! If your company would like to participate, please let us know by e-mailing contact@dotnetfoundation.org.

Announcing Microsoft’s Appointed Board Member: Beth Massi

I’m also pleased to announce that Beth Massi, Product Marketing Manager for the .NET Platform at Microsoft is being appointed to the Board of Directors. Beth was part of the original team that got the .NET Foundation started back in 2014, and has been helping out behind the scenes ever since then in countless ways: coordinating our messaging, serving as the .NET Foundation secretary, organizing events like .NET Conf, the list goes on an on. Beth has a real passion for open source .NET, as anyone who talks to her about 30 seconds will attest. She’s a team player, but not at all afraid to speak up when she disagrees. She brings so much into this role: all the context and history to understand the .NET Foundation’s mission and potential, a huge passion to push it further, and all the organizational and communication skills to make it happen.

Read Beth's great story of the history of the .NET Foundation from her perspective: Building an Open Source .NET Foundation.

Join Us!

I’m really proud of what the .NET Foundation’s been able to accomplish since it was founded in 2014, but when I think about what we’re announcing today I feel like we’re just getting started. I’m thrilled to be able to welcome you – yes, you! – to become an active member of the .NET Foundation, perhaps even run for a board seat, and help make 2019 our biggest year yet.

Here's the November edition of the .NET Foundation newsletter. Every month, we'll give you a quick overview of the .NET Open Source landscape, including top project news, events, community links and more.

This month's newsletter includes:

  • News from .NET Foundation member projects
  • A heads up on some exciting announcements about the .NET Foundation at the Connect event keynote on December 4
  • .NET Meetup news

As always, these are available both on our blog and via e-mail: Sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail


Stay tuned for some big news at the Connect event!

We've got some really exciting updates on the way for the .NET Foundation! Watch the Connect event keynote on December 4 for the announcement, and keep an eye on our @dotnetfdn Twitter handle and blog for the announcement post and details.

We can't wait to tell you about it! This next year is going to be amazing!


.NET Foundation Project News

IdentityServer 2.3 Release and ASP.NET Core Integration 

As recently announced, IdentityServer will be the default authentication and API security solution in ASP.NET Core. The integration will ship shortly after the ASP.NET Core 2.2 release. The basis for this integration is the new version 2.3 of IdentityServer that has been released last week.

To ensure maximum compatibility with all versions of the .NET Framework, this release has been strong named, and for extra security, both the binaries and the Nuget packages are digitally signed.

Besides many smaller improvements and bug fixes, the new version now support the so-called “Device Flow” which enables devices without a browser or limited input capabilities (e.g. gaming consoles, hardware devices) to securely connect to APIs.
 

DNN Summit

Training, Speaker, and Session info have been posted to the DNN Summit site.
 

NUnit 3.11.2

A 3.11.2 hotfix for the NUnit VSTest adapter is available, addressing duplicate categories in Test Explorer. NUnit Visual Studio Test Generator 2.1 was also released. It now generates an NUnit3TestAdapter package reference required by VS 15.9+.
It's been a quieter month with several new features in progress. The contributions are greatly appreciated!

On December 1st, we plan to stop supporting .NET Framework 2.0 in NUnit framework 3.12 and forward. Last-minute comments are welcome at https://github.com/nunit/nunit/issues/3070.
 

Json.NET 12.0 Release 1 - .NET Foundation, NuGet and Authenticode signing, SourceLink and more

This month, we announced that Json.NET, one of the most popular .NET projects in the solar system, has joined the .NET Foundation. This post announces the new 12.0 release, as well as some new features that we helped support: code signing and SourceLink support.
 

AutoMapper 8.0.0 Released

AutoMapper 8.0 brings some breaking API changes, meant to simplify our configuration options which have grown quite a bit over time and remove some confusion about what configuration options were effectively equivalent. The upgrade guide walks through the breaking changes.

This release also includes a new feature, Value Converters, which allow you to define reusable mappers scoped to individual members.
 

Akka.NET on .NET Rocks

Check out Aaron's discussion of Akka.NET with Carl and Richard on the .NET Rocks podcast.
 

Announcing ML.NET 0.7 (Machine Learning .NET)

This release of ML.NET includes the following:

BenchmarkDotNet v0.11.3

This release is focused mainly on bug fixes that were affecting user experience. But don't worry, this release also has some new features too!

  • Diagnosers
    • ConcurrencyVisualizerProfiler (allows profiling benchmarks on Windows and exporting the data to a trace file which can be opened with Concurrency Visualizer)
  • Command-line:
    • --stopOnFirstError: Stops the benchmarks execution on first error. #947
    • --statisticalTest: Performs a Mann–Whitney Statistical Test for identifying regressions and improvements. #960
  • Bug fixes:
    • Dry mode doesn't work because of the ZeroMeasurementHelper #943
    • MannWhitneyTest fails when comparing statistics of different sample size #948 and #950
    • Improve the dynamic loading of Diagnostics package #955
    • BenchmarkRunner.RunUrl throws NRE when Config is not provided #961
    • Don't require the users to do manual installation of TraceEvent when using Diagnostics package #962
    • Stop benchmark after closing application + Flush log after stopping benchmark #963

PeachPie 0.9.18

This release includes support for .NET generics, custom attributes, and plenty of fixes.

Read the announcement here.

Free eBook on Modernizing .NET Applications from the Steeltoe team

Want to learn how to take advantage of Steeltoe to help modernize your .NET applications? Check out this 90 page eBook from Richard Seroter!

Meetups

Our .NET Foundation sponsored .NET Meetup Pro groups continue to grow. Here are some quick stats:

  • 240 Groups
  • 51 Countries
  • 147K Members

We've also started sending newsletters to Meetup organizers, including some links for some free swag for their groups. If your meetup hasn't joined yet, you can right here.


Connect with the .NET Foundation online

The .NET Foundation is on Facebook now. Please like our page! We’ll post regular updates and interesting things happening with .NET to share.

The .NET Foundation is also on YouTube. Watch community standups and design reviews as well as code-focused shows and interviews across our multiple playlists.


Remember to Subscribe!

Please sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail. Don’t worry, we want to keep these short, interesting, and low-noise, so we won’t overload your e-mail.

Today, I'm thrilled to welcome Json.NET to the .NET Foundation!Json.NET Logo

Json.NET is a popular high-performance JSON framework for .NET. It's very well known to .NET developers - with over 164 million NuGet downloads, it's by far the most popular community NuGet package and a fundamental part of the .NET open source ecosystem.

Supporting .NET open source projects like Json.NET is a core part of the .NET Foundation's mission. As part of bringing the Json.NET project onboard, we've been able to help support James and team with the Json.NET 12 release. A key example is getting the project set up with the .NET Foundation's code signing service and providing a code signing certificate.

You can read more about the Json.NET 12 release on the project's release announcement post.

Here's the October edition of the .NET Foundation newsletter. Every month, we'll give you a quick overview of the .NET Open Source landscape, including top project news, events, community links and more.

This month's newsletter includes:

  • News from .NET Foundation member projects
  • Visual Studio Live keynote
  • .NET Meetup news

As always, these are available both on our blog and via e-mail: Sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail

.NET Foundation Project News

NUnit Framework 3.11.0 Release

NUnit framework 3.11.0 was released this month, including the features highlighted in last month's newsletter. NUnit VSTest adapter 3.11.0 was just released also! One of the fixes is that Mono.Cecil will no longer be overwritten in the test project, unblocking the testing of code that depends on Mono.Cecil. The NUnit team is considering dropping the .NET Framework 2.0 build of NUnit in the next release. We are eager to hear from anyone who may be affected—please join the discussion at https://github.com/nunit/nunit/issues/3070. Thank you!

DNN Summit

DNN Summit is coming up in February 2019 with Jon Galloway as the keynote speaker!

Windows Community Toolkit 5.0

The Windows Community Toolkit graduated to version 5.0. This update introduces the WindowsXamlHost control and wrapped UWP controls for WPF and Windows Forms, new TabView control for UWP, and Weibo .NET Standard service. Read more here.

Visual Studio Live! San Diego Keynote

.NET Foundation Secretary Beth Massi and Executive Director Jon Galloway presented a keynote at Visual Studio Live! San Diego titled .NET Today and Tomorrow on October 9. Visual Studio Magazine did a great write-up of the keynote - take a look!

Meetups

Our .NET Foundation sponsored .NET Meetup Pro groups continued to see rapid growth month, with lots of in-person events for our .NET Conf Local Events series. Here are some quick stats:

  • 233 Groups (up 25 this past month)
  • 50 Countries
  • 141K Members (added 15K in the past 30 days!)

We've also started sending newsletters to Meetup organizers, including some links for some free swag for their groups. If your meetup hasn't joined yet, you can right here.


Connect with the .NET Foundation online

The .NET Foundation is on Facebook now. Please like our page! We’ll post regular updates and interesting things happening with .NET to share.

The .NET Foundation is also on YouTube. Watch community standups and design reviews as well as code-focused shows and interviews across our multiple playlists.


Remember to Subscribe!

Please sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail. Don’t worry, we want to keep these short, interesting, and low-noise, so we won’t overload your e-mail.

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Infer.NET logoWe're really excited to announce that Infer.NET is joining the .NET Foundation!

Infer.NET is model-based machine learning system for .NET, developed by Microsoft Research in Cambridge, UK. It's a mature and widely used system, as it's been developed since 2004, and is the machine learning engine in a number of Microsoft products in Office, Xbox and Azure. A recent example is TrueSkill 2 – a system that matches players in online video games. Implemented in Infer.NET, it is running live in the bestselling titles Halo 5 and Gears of War 4, processing millions of matches.

But in an age of abundance of machine learning libraries, what sets Infer.NET apart from the competition? Great question, and well answered by the Infer.NET team's post announcing they're joining the .NET Foundation:

Infer.NET enables a model-based approach to machine learning. This lets you incorporate domain knowledge into your model. The framework can then build a bespoke machine learning algorithm directly from that model. This means that instead of having to map your problem onto a pre-existing learning algorithm that you’ve been given, Infer.NET actually constructs a learning algorithm for you, based on the model you’ve provided.

Want to know more? Start with the announcement post from the Infer.NET team, then check out their Tutorials, Examples, and User Guide