It’s time for the March Update! As always, these are available both on our blog and via e-mail: Sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail

.NET Foundation Updates

Meetups

The .NET Foundation sponsored .NET Meetup Pro groups are continuing to grow! Here are some quick stats:

Please help connect us with other groups you're aware of that haven't joined yet by dropping me a note jon@dotnetfoundation.org or leaving a comment below.​


.NET Foundation Project News

Orleans 2.0 Release

Orleans 2.0 is out! 2.0 is the first major overhaul of Orleans since the original release in 2015. The four key areas of investment were:

  1. .NET Core compatibility, and hence also ability to run on non-Windows platforms.
  2. Deep refactoring of the APIs to leverage the new capabilities of the platform (configuration, dependency injection, tracing, etc.) and to modernize and align it with the style and direction of .NET Core and ASP.NET APIs.
  3. Revamped extensibility model that enables adding and composing of new types of capabilities without the need to change the framework.
  4. Support for distributed transaction – storage-agnostic scalable ACID operations (beta).

Grab the new release here.

DNN v9.2 Release

DNN v9.2 released. This release brings "Prompt", a CLI for DNN, that originated as an OSS contribution from one of our community members, Kelly Ford. 9.2 also offers performance optimizations, new page management, stabilization, the Azure storage connector, and dependency updates.

While 9.2 has been released the DNN Technology Advisory Group continues meeting weekly planning out the course for migrating DNN to .NET Core.

See the release notes here.

.NET Core 2.1 Preview 1 - How's It Working For You?

The .NET Core team would love your feedback on how .NET Core 2.1 Preview 1 is working for you. Now is the time to get them your feedback so it can be included in the .NET Core 2.1 release.

You can report issues or feedback specific to the .NET Core 2.1 Preview release here.  
Read more about .NET Core 2.1 Preview 1 on this release post.


Community Links and News

Weekly ASP.NET Community Standup

If you want to keep up to date with the latest ASP.NET news, join the Weekly ASP.NET Community Standup with Scott Hanselman, Damian Edwards and Jon Galloway. This is a live video meeting every Tuesday, with demos of new features and prototypes, live Q&A, weekly community links, and more. Get the schedule, catch recent shows, and join the live standups at https://live.asp.net

Even better, you can subscribe to the .NET Foundation's YouTube channel to make sure you catch both the ASP.NET Community Standup and  .NET Design Reviews GitHub Triage every week.

Recent Standout Community Posts

Here are some recent posts we’ve featured on the ASP.NET Community Standup:

Connect with the .NET Foundation on the interwebs!

The .NET Foundation is on Facebook now. Please like our page! We’ll post regular updates and interesting things happening with .NET to share.

The .NET Foundation is also on YouTube. Watch community standups and design reviews as well as code-focused shows and interviews across our multiple playlists.

Youtube

Do you have an interesting piece of news or content related to .NET open source? Let us know so we can include it in next month’s update by posting a comment below.


Remember to Subscribe!

Please sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail.

Subscribe

Don’t worry, we want to keep these short, interesting, and low-noise, so we won’t overload your e-mail.

Hey! It’s the February Update! As always, these are available both on our blog and via e-mail: Sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail

.NET Foundation Updates

Meetups

The .NET Foundation sponsored .NET Meetup Pro groups have been busy! Here are some quick stats:

Please help connect us with other groups you're aware of that haven't joined yet by dropping me a note jon@dotnetfoundation.org or leaving a comment below.​


.NET Foundation Project News

Roadmap Announcements for .NET Core 2.1, ASP.NET Core 2.1, EF Core 2.1

This month, the .NET, ASP.NET, and Entity Framework teams announced their 2.1 roadmaps in the following blog posts:

For a great overview, with updates and demonstrations from the program managers, see the following two videos:

.NET Core 2.1 Roadmap PT.1

.NET Core 2.1 Roadmap PT.2

A new experiment: Browser-based web apps with .NET and Blazor

The ASP.NET team announced a new experiment called Blazor. Blazor is an experimental web UI framework based on C#, Razor, and HTML that runs in the browser via WebAssembly. Blazor promises to greatly simplify the task of building fast and beautiful single-page applications that run in any browser. It does this by enabling developers to write .NET-based web apps that run client-side in web browsers using open web standards.

Read more about Blazor, including how to try out the bits and get involved, on the announcement post here.

Steeltoe Turns 2.0, Adds Support for ASP.NET Core 2.0, CredHub, and a SQL Server Connector

The Steeltoe project just announced a big release, including support for ASP.NET Core 2.0 and .NET Standard 2.0! Steeltoe is a great, recent addition to the .NET Foundation, with lots of powerful features to help you build cloud-native microservices on .NET. This release really rounds out the Steeltoe offering with solid .NET Core 2.0 support, so if you’ve been waiting to take a look, this release is a great time to jump in!

Take a look at the Steeltoe team’s announcement post here.

IdentityServer4 updates from NDC London

At NDC London 2018, The IdentityServer team made a lot of exciting announcements:

  • A new website (at https://identityserver.io)
  • The new ASP.NET Core v2 Authentication System
  • Improved support for OpenID Connect logout scenarios
  • Admin UI Community Edition
  • Ways you can support the IdentityServer project… and ways the IdentityServer project can support you

Read more in this post.

Chem4Word V3 – Release 3

Chem4Word 3.0 is available! The new version includes some dramatic enhancements over previous versions:

  • Up to 12,000% quicker drawing of chemical structures!
  • Simplified storage model allowing standard cut and paste!
  • The Gallery is now the new, database-driven Library. Store, manage and search for your favourite chemical structures! No need to overwrite your standard template to save structures.
  • Vastly enhanced Chemical Navigator shows structures clearly and in full colour.
  • Better integration with PubChem, CheEBI and Opsin online search tools.
  • Plug-in architecture allows developers to produce their own enhancements.
  • The new FlexDisplay component showcases how Windows Presentation Foundation can be used to produce high-quality chemical graphics.

And it's all totally free!

Grab the latest release here.


Community Links and News

Weekly ASP.NET Community Standup

If you want to keep up to date with the latest ASP.NET news, join the Weekly ASP.NET Community Standup with Scott Hanselman, Damian Edwards and Jon Galloway. This is a live video meeting every Tuesday, with demos of new features and prototypes, live Q&A, weekly community links, and more. Get the schedule, catch recent shows, and join the live standups at https://live.asp.net

Dotnetos – .NET Performance Tour (Poland)

Here’s a fun, free event tour if you’re in or near Poland: the Three Dotnetos (Łukasz Pyrzyk, Szymon Kulec, and Konrad Kokosa) are putting on a 5 city tour. Get more information on the site: https://dotnetos.org/

Recent Standout Community Posts

Here are some recent posts we’ve featured on the ASP.NET Community Standup:

Connect with the .NET Foundation on the interwebs!

The .NET Foundation is on Facebook now. Please like our page! We’ll post regular updates and interesting things happening with .NET to share.

The .NET Foundation is also on YouTube. Watch community standups and design reviews as well as code-focused shows and interviews across our multiple playlists.

Youtube

Do you have an interesting piece of news or content related to .NET open source? Let us know so we can include it in next month’s update by posting a comment below.


Remember to Subscribe!

Please sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail.

Subscribe

We’re planning to send these out at the beginning of every month going forward, so that means you should see the February one in just a few weeks. Don’t worry, we want to keep these short, interesting, and low-noise, so we won’t overload your e-mail.

Welcome to the first of a series: our regular .NET Foundation updates! We’ll be posting these on our blog, but to make sure you don’t miss one, please subscribe to get them via e-mail.

Sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail

We’re planning to send these out at the beginning of every month going forward, so that means you should see the February one in just a few weeks. Don’t worry, we want to keep these short, interesting, and low-noise, so we won’t overload your e-mail.

.NET Foundation Updates

Meetups

The .NET Foundation has sponsored a .NET Meetup Pro group and now has over 100 member groups. If you’re looking for a .NET Meetup in your area, this should help you find Meetups that are focused on .NET; if you run a .NET meetup we’ll pay for your Meetup Pro membership.

Please help connect us with other groups you're aware of that haven't joined yet by dropping me a note jon@dotnetfoundation.org or leaving a comment below.​


Open Collective

One issue many open source projects deal with is handling finances in an open source friendly way. We've set up an umbrella organization under Open Collective to make it easier for your projects to accept money (donations, sponsorships, bounties) and to make payments in an open, transparent way. For an example of an open source project where this has worked really well, see the webpack Open Collective: https://opencollective.com/webpack. Open Collective's model is that a parent institution (in this case, .NET Foundation) holds the money for you. This is especially useful for community projects with several owners who don't want to deal with deciding who holds the money and dealing with accounting, reporting to the community, etc.

You obviously have other options, and I'd encourage you to do whatever makes the most sense for your project. For instance, in working with the IdentityServer team, we agreed that Patreon made more sense for them (https://www.patreon.com/identityserver).

If you host a .NET Meetup or run a .NET Foundation project and would like to get set up with Open Collective, e-mail me at jon@dotnetfoundation.org.

CLA System Upgrade

One of the technical services we offer .NET Foundation projects is access to our Contributor License Agreement (CLA) automation system for GitHub pull requests. We’ve recently completed a pretty significant upgrade from our previous legacy system. The new system is build on the open source CLA Assistant  project and is a lot more reliable and easy to maintain. Users will have a better experience since they can just click through in the browser (no need to use DocuSign). Project owners will see less noise on the repo as the CLA messaging is cleanly integrated into the GitHub required pull request review steps and doesn't add status comments to the pull request.

One of the features of the new system is that it's easier to add new projects. We’re still working through getting some new projects onboarded, but it’s a much simpler process now.


.NET Foundation Project News

UWP Community Toolkit

The UWP Community Toolkit was recently updated to v2.1 which introduced new helpers for composition animations and visuals, new DockPanel control, support for new FCU controls and more to simplify and demonstrates common developer tasks building apps for Windows 10. Contributors are always welcomed to submit issues or pull request to add new awesome features.

More information on the new UWP Community Toolkit release is in this announcement post.

BenchmarkDotNet

BenchmarkDotNet v0.10.12 has been released!

There are a lot of improvements in the main .NET benchmarking tool:

  • New TailCallDiagnoser: now you get notifications when JIT applies the tail call optimizations to your methods.
  • Improved MemoryDiagnoser: it has a better precision level, and it takes less time to evaluate memory allocations in a benchmark.
  • Improved DisassemblyDiagnoser: BenchmarkDotNet contains an embedded disassembler so that it can print assembly code for all benchmarks; it's not easy, but the disassembler evolves in every release.
  • Better environment info: when your share performance results, it's very important to share information about your environment. The library generates the environment summary for you by default. Now it contains information about the amount of physical CPU, physical cores, and logic cores. If you run a benchmark on a virtual machine, you will get the name of the hypervisor (e.g., Hyper-V, VMware, or VirtualBox).
  • Better summary table: one of the greatest features of BenchmarkDotNet is the summary table. It shows all important information about results in a compact and understandable form. Now it has better customization options: you can display relative performance of different environments (e.g., compare .NET Framework and .NET Core) and group benchmarks by categories.
  • Other minor improvements and bug fixes

Read more in this announcement post.

Polly

Major new features added to Polly over the last few months include:

Next on the roadmap is enabling policies to emit events which could be streamed (for example by Rx) as telemetry to dashboards.


Community Links and News

The .NET Foundation is on Facebook now. Please like our page! We’ll post regular updates and interesting things happening with .NET to share.

Recently Matt Warren, a .NET MVP, wrote up this pretty interesting post on Open Source .NET - 3 Years Later (http://mattwarren.org/2017/12/19/Open-Source-.Net-3-years-later) . In the post, he highlights the community's involvement in .NET repositories. It’s amazing to see the growth we’ve achieved in just three years. I’m very encouraged by our fantastic community contributing to .NET open source.

The .NET Foundation is also on YouTube. Watch community standups and design reviews as well as code-focused shows and interviews across our multiple playlists.

Youtube

Do you have an interesting piece of news or content related to .NET open source? Let us know so we can include it in next month’s update by posting a comment below.


Remember to Subscribe!

Please sign up to get the .NET Foundation Update via e-mail.

Subscribe

We’re planning to send these out at the beginning of every month going forward, so that means you should see the February one in just a few weeks. Don’t worry, we want to keep these short, interesting, and low-noise, so we won’t overload your e-mail.

It’s a big week! Yesterday at Microsoft Connect, we announced that Steeltoe is joining the .NET Foundation. Today, we’re really happy to announce seven more great projects are joining!

DNN Platform (formerly DotNetNuke) is a very popular, full featured CMS Platform with a rich developer community and extension ecosystem. DNN has been a trailblazer in the .NET open source world, released 15 years ago and taking a great leadership role in .NET open source over the years, including of course DNN founder Shaun Walker’s chairmanship of the .NET Foundation’s Advisory Council. Read the DNN Software team’s announcement post here.

NUnit is very popular testing framework. The project has been around since 2000 and by my count has almost 15 million downloads on NuGet (although of course it predated NuGet by over a decade). The NUnit maintainers have worked tirelessly for years to help the .NET community ship higher quality software, and we’re so happy to be able to support this valuable project. The NUnit team has written about joining the .NET Foundation here.

IronPython is another long-running .NET open source project, having been in active development for over a decade. Originally developed by Microsoft, IronPython has been maintained by the community since 2010. We’re happy to invest in this project for the long term, and are excited to be working with the awesome Alex Earl, who’s been leading development efforts for IronPython and the DLR for the past year. Here’s the IronPython team’s post about joining the .NET Foundation.

MvvmCross is a really cool project that helps you build native applications for Xamarin, UWP and WPF using the Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) pattern. We first worked with them during the .NET Summer Hackfest, and without question they were our model project, with 57 pull requests and a great mini-conference to show for it. They’ve got a great community and an incredibly (frighteningly?) competent leadership team. During our meetings for the .NET Summer Hackfest, we both agreed they’d be a great addition to the .NET Foundation, and we’re so happy to welcome them. Here’s the MvvmCross team’s post about joining the .NET Foundation.

SourceLink is a set of build tools to help create and test support for source linking, which works with the Portable PDB format to download source code on demand while you’re debugging. It’s a great example of the community jumping in to fill in a much needed gap. Cameron’s been working on this for years, and we’re happy to support him and his team.

ILMerge is a static linker for .NET assemblies. ILMerge has saved the day for me more than once, and I was really excited when Mike Barnett reached out to ask about contributing ILMerge to the .NET Foundation. Welcome!

Humanizer is a library that helps you manipulate and display strings, enums, times, numbers and more. It helps you build more friendly applications by expressing programmatic values in clear language: a timespan becomes “1 year, 3 months, 29 days”, it handles text manipulations like hyphenation and truncation, and it works across dozens of languages.

The .NET Foundation has a mandate – and a passion – to support the .NET open source community. We’re thankful for the trust our member projects place in us, and energized by the opportunity to support them.

More good stuff coming,
Jon

The .NET Foundation is happy to announce that Steeltoe is joining the .NET Foundation!

Steeltoe is an open source project that enables .NET developers to implement industry standard best practices when building resilient microservices for the cloud. The Steeltoe client libraries enable .NET Core and .NET Framework apps to easily leverage Netflix Eureka, Hystrix, Spring Cloud Config Server, and Cloud Foundry services.

Steeltoe is a rich open source framework, developed by Pivotal. It helps solve some complex requirements of real-world microservices applications such as:

  • Service discovery via a .NET client for Netflix Eureka
  • Cloud configuration that leverages Spring Cloud Config Server and a custom .NET Configuration Provider
  • Circuit Breaker implementation to bypass failing services using a .NET implementation of Netflix Hystrix
  • Cloud Connectors to automate configuration and wireup for Redis, RabbitMQ, MySQL and Postgres
  • Cloud Security Providers which integrate ASP.NET Core authentication and authorization with Cloud Foundry security services

For more information, see Steeltoe’s announcement post.