Today, we’re thrilled to announce that Okta and Volosoft are joining the .NET Foundation as Corporate Sponsors.

Okta and Volosoft join a growing list of industry leaders in the .NET open source ecosystem who support the .NET Foundation as corporate sponsors, including AWS, DevExpress, Endjin, Microsoft, Octopus Deploy, Uno Platform, Progress Telerik, and VMware.

Okta Logo

Volosoft Logo

Volosoft, always thinks of open-source first. Volosoft was established based on an open-source project, ASP.NET Boilerplate. They spend most of their time developing open-source projects and building communities, focusing on the ABP.IO platform. As a company that succeeds in building a business model around an open-source platform, Volosoft is aware that it is hard to create and maintain open-source projects.

For more information, please see the announcement from the Volosoft team here.

For more information about the .NET Foundation’s Corporate Sponsor Program, see this page.

Claire Novotny
Executive Director, .NET Foundation

Pwned Passwords is the password search feature for Have I Been Pwned (HIBP), a free service that aggregates data breaches and helps people find out if they've been impacted by malicious activity on the web. With close to 1 billion requests per month, this free service is used by individuals and organizations all over the world. In addition to the traditional breached data sets, HIBP will now also receive compromised passwords discovered in the course of FBI investigations. This will further enhance the quality and timeliness of the data in the HIBP service for its users.

I am proud to welcome the new Pwned Passwords open source project to the .NET Foundation as our first incubation project! Troy Hunt, renowned security expert and Microsoft MVP/RD, built this vital service with .NET on Azure. I’ve spoken with Troy over the last few months. I know he has given much thought about open sourcing the code so the project can have a sustainable future and evolve with contributions from the community.

In Troy’s words: "The philosophy of HIBP has always been to support the community, now I want the community to help support HIBP."

The .NET Foundation can provide that support structure through mentorship, sponsorship as well as administrative and technical services we provide to our projects. We encourage you to learn more about the HIBP project and how you can get involved. Start by reading Troy’s blog post announcement and visiting the project repo.

Thank you to all our members and broader .NET ecosystem for helping all our .NET Foundation projects thrive.

Claire Novotny
Executive Director, .NET Foundation

The .NET Foundation's Outreach Committee is happy to announce that we've finalized our proposal process. If you have an idea or project that you think can help promote the adoption of .NET, C#, F#, or other related technologies, you can now propose projects directly to the .NET Foundation.

Here is the process in depth:

Outreach Committee Proposal Process

Members can secure resources from the .NET Foundation to lead and implement outreach initiatives. Initiatives will be determined via the proposal process. These proposals can be of any size, but should be towards the goals of extending the reach of .NET and membership of the .NET Foundation in general.

How Do I Make a Proposal?

If you have an idea or project that you want to propose to the .NET Foundation's Outreach Committee, simply create an issue for your proposal using the provided template. The information you will need for the proposal includes:

  • Title
  • Description
  • Measure of impact (this can be number of people reached, potential size of group, current number of meetup members...etc)
  • Requested Budget
  • Size of Comittee Requested (how many people do you need to get this off the ground)
  • Which Goal and Priority is this project aligned with
  • How will we know this project has been successful?

What is the Proposal Approval Process?

Proposals will be reviewed on a first-come, first-served basis. Each Proposal will be reviewed in several steps:

  1. Initial Response: Within seven-days of submission, one of the committee members will respond to the issue created with a short response of when we will move to the second part of the approval. The committee member who responds shall be responsible for getting the proposal added to the next monthly Outreach Committee meeting.
  2. Committee Meeting: During the next monthly Outreach Committee meeting, a discussion will be had if the proposal has merit and is within scope and budget of the Outreach committee. This step usually will result in one of four possible results:
    1. Approved.
    2. Declined.
    3. Need more information (Proposal owner may be asked to attend the Outreach Committee to discuss the proposal).
    4. Need to bring the proposal to the .NET Foundation Board meeting (usually required if needed more than Outreach has for budget).
  3. Board Meeting: As is necessary, we will bring proposals to the .NET Foundation Board of Directors to get approval to use additional budget if possible.

What Kinds of Proposals are We Looking For?

We are looking for proposals large and small that help us reach communities of all different types. We are interested in proposals that help expose developers to .NET around the world.


To propose a project, just visit the project:

Issues List

And pick "Proposal":

Outreach Proposal Screenshot

You can then just fill out the simple post and we'll take it to our monthly meeting! It's that simple:

Outreach Issue

Thanks for helping us grow the .NET ecosystem.

Shawn Wildermuth
.NET Foundation Outreach Committee

Welcome to the .NET Foundation update for March & April. Every other month, we'll give you a quick overview of the .NET open source landscape and what the .NET Foundation is up to, including top project news, events, community links and more.

Sign up for the newsletter and get these updates delivered right to your inbox.

General news

.NET Foundation "State of .NET" survey results

We launched a "State of .NET" survey in November that closed on March 31, 2021. Thank you to all who participated. Your feedback is very important to the .NET Foundation. This was the first survey ever done by the .NET Foundation to the .NET developer community and we will continue to do them every year going forward. The survey was conducted via SurveyMonkey. We collected 4,509 responses, analyzed all the results, read all the comments, and wrote about our findings. You can view the reports and our insights here and download the anonymous raw data here.

Those who entered to win a $250 gift certificate to the .NET Foundation Store will be notified via email if you are a winner. Thank you again for participating.

.NET Foundation Project Updates

Project Spotlight

Each month Project Spotlight shines a light on an interesting open source project and its maintainers.

In March, .NET Foundation Marketing Committee member, Isaac Levin, spoke with Maintainer of the Orleans project, Reuben Bond, to talk about the work Microsoft is doing in the Microservices space with .NET.

Orleans

Orleans is a framework for building stateful, cloud applications. Orleans applications are composed of Cloud Native Objects which allow developers to write applications which scale from a single machine to a large cluster without modifying code. Orleans efficiently distributes these objects as your application scales and handles the complexities of distributed systems so that developers can focus on application logic. Orleans powers many services in Microsoft, including Azure PlayFab, Azure ML, Dynamics 365 Fraud Protection, and backends for some of the largest Xbox games.

In April, Isaac spoke with Maintainer of the Roslyn Compiler project, Jared Parsons, and gave a little insight into how Microsoft thinks about building compilers and other language tools.

Roslyn

Roslyn is the C# and Visual Basic compiler and IDE experience project. It contains the source code for all of your C# and VB experiences all the way from the core compilers, Intellisense, syntax highlighting, and edit and continue logic. Anything you want to know about how your development environment works for .NET you can see in action in this repository.

New Projects

The .NET Foundation would like to welcome the following new projects!

Stride Game Engine Stride Stride is an open-source C# game engine for realistic rendering and VR. The engine is highly modular and aims at giving game makers more flexibility in their development. Stride comes with an editor that allows you to create and manage the content of your games or applications visually and intuitively.
C# standardization NFLogo This project produces the standard C# language specification. The ECMA committee standardizes the formal specification of the C# language
Ant Design Blazor AntDesignBlazor Ant Design Blazor is a set of enterprise-class UI components based on Ant Design and Blazor.
Finbuckle.MultiTenant Finbuckle Finbuckle.MultiTenant is a open source multitenancy library for .NET. It provides for tenant resolution, per-tenant app behavior, and per-tenant data isolation.
Silk.NET SilkNET Silk.NET is a high-performance, low-level wrapper over many native libraries that forms a one-stop-shop for .NET graphics and compute workloads, such as custom game/game engine development. Aiming to be the one library you need for multimedia, graphics, and compute applications.

New Releases

Oqtane 2.0.1 Released

Since releasing version 2.0 in coordination with the .NET 5 launch event at .NET Conf in November 2020, the exciting new modular application framework for Blazor has continued to mature and gain momentum. This release includes a variety of performance and user experience improvements for both users and developers. A total of 101 pull requests were merged from 9 different contributors, pushing the total number of project commits all-time over 1600. The 2.0.1 release is available for download on Github.

.NET Foundation Committee Updates

Marketing Committee Update

  • The Marketing committee is working towards a new web presence, including a new design and content updates to make it easier for visitors to navigate and find value as well as to make it easier for volunteers to contribute. We hope to start the project in May and complete it by the end of June.
  • We've been working with the Project committee on a GTM checklist to help new projects think through their marketing presence and activities.
  • We merged the Xamarin store into the .NET Foundation store so there are now a bunch of new items available to show off your pride for Xamarin. Microsoft also donated new dotnet-bot T-shits and stickers with an adventure theme to the store. Show your support and check out the new Hiking and Juggling T-shirts and the Lounge, Play, Practice and Work stickers.
  • We updated the .NET Foundation slide deck that you can use to help spread the good word about the foundation.

Events

JetBrains .NET Days Online 2021

For the third time, JetBrains are organizing JetBrains .NET Days Online - a free virtual event that will take place on May 11–12, 2021. Community speakers are presenting topics they are passionate about. You can expect a variety of levels of technical content, and speakers may also share their personal experiences and development.

The topics on this year’s agenda include C#, F#, GraphQL, Blazor, gRPC, Hedy, working with databases, and debugging. On top of that, we’ll discuss stereotypes around legacy code and demonstrate how to build a React app backed with Azure features.

For more information, head over to the registration page!

Microsoft Build 2021, May 25 - 27

Learn. Connect. Code. Register for the Microsoft Build digital event happening May 25 - 27, 2021. This free event will feature a fantastic lineup of sessions from Satya Nadella, Scott Guthrie and Microsoft developer tools leaders including Amanda Silver, Scott Hanselman, Scott Hunter, and Donovan Brown. You will also learn about what's coming in .NET 6, Visual Studio, Azure, GitHub and more. Register for free today.

.NET Conf: Focus on Windows, sessions now on-demand

.NET Conf: Focus on Windows virtual event was broadcasted on February 25th with 9 hours of content over 17 sessions. The event showcased Windows development on .NET 5, introduced the .NET Upgrade Assistant to help developers move their .NET Framework-based apps to .NET 5, and provided deep learning on a variety of topics important to Windows developers. There were 25K live views and 18K unique viewers throughout the day.

The .NET Foundation sponsored the event and we coordinated a joint announcement on the broadcast during the keynote with the Uno Platform. Uno Platform has joined as corporate sponsor. Uno Platform joins the group of corporations that are helping drive the future of the .NET platform and ecosystem and we are incredibly grateful for their support.

If you missed it, you can watch th sessions, get the slides and demos, and grab your virtual swag by heading to https://focus.dotnetconf.net

How to Get Involved

The .NET Foundation is only as good as the community that supports it. There are many ways to get involved. 

Support a project

Projects, and the people behind them, are at the heart of what .NET Foundation is all about. These days, you’ll find a wide variety of projects under the .NET Foundation. Can you contribute to something already in the works? Browse our projects to find out how to contribute. 

Become a member 

By involving people that are passionate about .NET we can create a powerful organization that furthers sustainable open source, a diverse and open community, and help evolve this growing and evolving ecosystem that we are very passionate about. If you are as passionate about the .NET ecosystem as we are, then you should consider becoming a member of the .NET Foundation. Read more about member benefits and please join to help shape the future.

Join a committee

The .NET Foundation Committees are where the vast majority of work gets done in the Foundation. The more you participate the more we can do together. Please visit the committee hub on our website to learn more and how you can get involved. 

Spread the word

Help spread .NET Foundation's message. Take a look at the .NET Foundation slides and use them in your presentations and events. Members can also request promotion of their events and open source related content. See the marketing repo for details. 

Buy some merch

Show off your nerd side with pride! Support the .NET Foundation by rocking some gear from our store. Check out the new items and don't forget to show them off on Twitter #dotnetlovesme

Have some fun

Coding is better with friends, especially when they bring their own mods. As the mascot for the .NET community, dotnet-bot helps with checking pull requests on .NET repos on GitHub. Create your own coding companion by building your own custom dotnet-bot at mod-dotnet-bot.net and sharing it on Twitter #dotnetlovesme

mod-dotnet-bot.net

Welcome to the .NET Foundation update for January & February. Every other month, we'll give you a quick overview of the .NET open source landscape and what the .NET Foundation is up to, including top project news, events, community links and more.

Sign up for the newsletter and get these updates delivered right to your inbox.

General news

Welcome Uno Platform as Corporate Sponsor!

Uno-heart-dotnet-foundation_cover

The .NET Foundation is thrilled to announce that Uno Platform has joined as a corporate sponsor! Uno Platform is an open source project which lets you build single-codebase applications with C# and WinUI for Windows, WebAssembly, Linux, macOS, iOS and Android. Uno Platform joins the group of corporations that are helping drive the future of the .NET platform and ecosystem and we are incredibly grateful for their support. The .NET Foundation relies on sponsors to fund our mission to create a thriving .NET open source ecosystem. Thank you, Uno Platform for being part of this effort. Read Uno Platform sponsorship announcement.

Please take the "State of .NET" survey

In November we launched a "State of .NET" survey and we're encouraging everyone in the .NET community to participate. Your feedback is very important to the .NET Foundation. It will help us understand our community needs better and prioritize the work that we do. The survey will stay open until March 31, 2021 after which the results will be made public. If you complete the survey you can enter to win a $250 gift certificate (multiple winners). Please visit our survey page and thank you to everyone that has completed it already.

Take our Survey

.NET Foundation Speaker Directory

As part of the .NET Foundation's goals to help broaden the appeal of .NET, we're proud to announce the launch of the .NET Foundation speaker directory. The goal of the directory is to help people discover and encourage speakers from around the world as well as to provide mentors for new speakers. If you're looking for a speaker for your upcoming user group or event, you can find speakers that match your needs.

.NET Foundation Project Updates

Project Spotlight - DotVVM

Each month Project Spotlight shines a light on an interesting open source project and its maintainers. In this iteration, .NET Foundation Marketing Committee member, Isaac Levin, speaks with Maintainer of the DotVVM prject, Tomáš Herceg, to talk about his project.

DotVVM is an open-source framework that allows building ASP.NET apps using the MVVM approach with just C# and HTML. The framework is integrated in the ASP.NET ecosystem, ships with an extension for Visual Studio, and can be also used for modernizing old ASP.NET applications as it supports both OWIN and ASP.NET Core.

New Releases

CoreWCF 0.1.0 GA Release

After 21 months of public development, CoreWCF has reached its first GA release. Thank you to key contributors from Microsoft and AWS for making the project a success and getting our first release out the door. There were a lot of fundamental changes involved in building WCF on top of ASP.NET Core but we focued on delivering a great developer experience. This is a significant milestone towards supporting enterprise WCF services moving to CoreWCF hosted on any cloud platform. Read more about the release on the CoreWCF blog.

NUnit

Many new releases are out at once, and work is starting on future major versions. In addition to the notes below, the .NET Core Console remains in beta (release 3.12.0-beta2) due to some unresolved dependency loading and framework targeting issues. Contributions to fix these issues would be very welcome.

NUnit Framework 3.13 and 3.13.1

3.13 ships the first C# 8 Nullable Reference Types annotations. Almost all areas have been annotated. There are some important things to call out about this:

  • Assert methods don’t always throw exceptions when the assertion fails, due to the Multiple Asserts feature. Starting in version 3.6, Assert.NotNull(obj) no longer meant that obj would never be null on the following line. Assert.Catch and the other Assert methods are the same way. The nullability annotations added in 3.13 reflect this existing reality. We decided to only add nullability annotations that were accurate in every circumstance—a philosophy consistent with how .NET itself is annotated. This leads to the next point.

  • If you enable Nullable Reference Types in your test project, you will want to also add NUnit.Analyzers 3.0 or newer to your test project. Adding the analyzer is a great idea on its own, but it also specifically mitigates the problem in the previous point by suppressing C# compiler nullability warnings when we know it’s safe, when not in a Multiple Asserts context. This way you don’t have to use the C# null forgiveness operator (!) everywhere.

Another addition in 3.13 is the FixtureLifeCycle attribute. It enables you to stop sharing fixture instances between the tests inside that fixture. It is useful in combination with the Parallelizable Attribute because it allows tests within a fixture to run in isolation from each other without sharing instance fields and properties during parallel test runs.

3.13 also fixes several issues running tests in .NET 5.0. If your tests target .NET 5.0, we recommend updating to this release or a newer one.

NUnit Console and Engine 3.12

This release contains various improvements to running tests on .NET Core and Mono, and changes to extension loading logic to allow the Engine to better support extensions which target multiple platforms. There are additionally a number of fixes to issues that were identified with 3.12 Beta 1. Please also be aware that this will be the last version of the NUnit Engine to support .NET Standard 1.6.

NUnit Analyzers 0.5, 0.6, 2.0, and 3.0

These versions bring fixes, new features, and performance improvements. The 3.0 release of NUnit Analyzers automatically suppresses C# 8 Nullable Reference Types warnings based on context in order to fill the gap for conditions that can’t be expressed using C# annotations, as mentioned in the NUnit Framework section above. (Many thanks to Manfred Brands for this major contribution.) This functionality depends on a newer version of Roslyn which is not supported in Visual Studio 2017.

So we have decided to release two versions of the analyzers: versions starting with 2.x can be used in Visual Studio 2017. Versions starting with 3.x can be used in Visual Studio 2019. Most features will be available in both the 2.x versions and the 3.x versions unless they require Roslyn functionality that is only available in the 3.x versions.

Version 1.0.0 of Cake has been released🍰🎉

This version is the 112th release of Cake, but just not any release - they've finally hit 1.0 🎉

Major new features

  • .NET 5 support
  • C# 9 support
  • Implicit bootstrapping
  • Rewritten CLI
  • Frosting incorporated into main repository
  • Frosting CLI brought up to speed with Cake script runners
  • Improved globbing support
  • Greatly improved documentation
  • Bugfixes, increased test coverage, and integration tests

Full details and release notes in the release blog post: Cake v1.0.0 released

.NET Foundation Committee Updates

Membership Committee

The membership committee is working on expanded profiles to encourage more people in the .NET ecosystem to join the .NET Foundation. We see that there are many ways to contribute to the ecosystem, and we will use these profile definitions to encourage others to join. The profiles are not mutually exclusive, but should provide more ideas on how you can see yourself contributing to the foundation. We're also starting work on planning this year's board elections. If you're interested in serving on the nominating committee, watch for announcements.

Marketing Committee

We'd like to make our members aware of some marketing resources you can take advantage of.

Events

.NET Conf: Focus on Windows, February 25

Windows 550x182

The .NET Conf team is bringing you another ".NET Conf: Focus" event this Thursday, February 25th all about building apps for Windows. Last year they started a series of smaller, live events are delivered throughout the year that are focused on specific things you can do with .NET.

.NET Conf: Focus on Windows is a free, one-day livestream event that features speakers from the community and Microsoft teams working on Windows desktop apps and making them awesome on the latest .NET 5. Learn why and how to upgrade WPF and Windows Forms apps to .NET 5, see Visual Studio tooling improvements, learn how to leverage cloud services from your client apps, and a whole lot more. You'll also see what the future of native device development will look like in .NET 6.

Tune into focus.dotnetconf.net on February 25, 2021. Ask questions live and come learn how to move your Windows apps forward.

Save the date!

JetBrains .NET Day Online 2021 - Call for Speakers

JetBrains is organizing their third .NET Day Online on May 12, 2021. It is a free virtual event where community speakers cover topics they are passionate about, ranging from deep technical .NET content and speakers’ experiences with specific tools and technologies, to personal development.

They are looking for speakers interested in presenting, and welcome all topics that would be relevant to the wider .NET community.

For more information, head over to the Call for Speakers page!

How to Get Involved

The .NET Foundation is only as good as the community that supports it. There are many ways to get involved. 

Support a project

Projects, and the people behind them, are at the heart of what .NET Foundation is all about. These days, you’ll find a wide variety of projects under the .NET Foundation. Can you contribute to something already in the works? Browse our projects to find out how to contribute. 

Become a member 

By involving people that are passionate about .NET we can create a powerful organization that furthers sustainable open source, a diverse and open community, and help evolve this growing and evolving ecosystem that we are very passionate about. If you are as passionate about the .NET ecosystem as we are, then you should consider becoming a member of the .NET Foundation. Read more about member benefits and please join to help shape the future.

Join a committee

The .NET Foundation Committees are where the vast majority of work gets done in the Foundation. The more you participate the more we can do together. Please visit the committee hub on our website to learn more and how you can get involved. 

Spread the word

Help spread .NET Foundation's message. Take a look at the .NET Foundation slides and use them in your presentations and events. Members can also request promotion of their events and open source related content. See the marketing repo for details. 

Buy some merch

Show off your nerd side with pride! Support the .NET Foundation by rocking some gear from our store. Check out the new items and don't forget to show them off on Twitter #dotnetlovesme

Have some fun

Coding is better with friends, especially when they bring their own mods. As the mascot for the .NET community, dotnet-bot helps with checking pull requests on .NET repos on GitHub. Create your own coding companion by building your own custom dotnet-bot at mod-dotnet-bot.net and sharing it on Twitter #dotnetlovesme

mod-dotnet-bot.net